Dr Tony Lloyd (second right) welcomes Dr Park Young Kyoo (centre) and delegation from South Korea to

ADHD Foundation welcomes South Korean delegation to Liverpool

ADHD Foundation welcomed a delegation of medics from South Korea, who travelled thousands of miles to learn more about the groundbreaking work being undertaken by the Liverpool-based charity - viewed a global centre of excellence in its work supporting those living with ADHD.

Paediatricians and psychiatrists from the National Youth Healing Center - the only residential rehabilitation facility for ADHD youth in the whole of Korea - including its president, Dr Park Young Kyoon - were keen to find out more about the ADHD Foundation’s mental health care and education of children in Liverpool.

The work of ADHD Foundation aims at raising awareness and understanding of ADHD - a condition which affects approximately 500,000 school children - between five and eight per cent of the UK population. The wider national work of the ADHD Foundation supports those living with ADHD, their families, doctors, teachers and other agencies.

Chief executive of ADHD Foundation, Dr Tony Lloyd, said:

“ADHD Foundation was honoured and delighted to receive a letter from the National Youth Healing Center asking if they could visit our headquarters here in Liverpool, as they were eager to know more about our work in youth ADHD rehabilitation. To be chosen for this visit is testimony to the tireless and innovative work being carried out here by our team of teachers, nurses and psychologists and the doctors and parents who form the Board of Trustees at ADHD Foundation. It’s also a real coup for the city.”

ADHD Foundation was set up in 2007 to promote and improve the mental health outcomes, educational attainment, social inclusion and life chances of children, young people and adults affected by ADHD through early intervention with a range of training and therapies. Each year the charity supports over 500 families, many who have faced challenging behaviour by distressed children who struggle to communicate with their world or learn for some years before diagnosis is confirmed. The work that the foundation does can make the difference, allowing young people to self-manage the effect of their ADHD and develop resilience and coping strategies which allow them to live a full and active life.

ADHD Foundation is hosting a conference in Liverpool in November for teachers and doctors to better understand neurodevelopmental conditions such as ADHD and Autism. The conference, titled, ‘Innovation and Service Transformation in ADHD and ASD in Mental Health & Education’, aims to bring into focus best practice in health, social care and teaching to make a difference in young lives.

For more details about ADHD Foundation, visit www.adhdfoundation.org.uk

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