Landscape

Member Article

Bisexual or Bi-Curious? Choice is All Yours

What am I is a question that every person, man or woman, who is attracted to both genders face. However, there are more than answers to this question. Contrary to what many think, “bisexual” does not fit every person attracted to both genders. Other terms also exist, and examples include bi-curious, homoflexible, heteroflexible, ‘mostly gay’, and ‘mostly gay’.

The term ‘bisexuality’ is not enough

Bisexuality is a fluid term. That is, it’s not fenced by strictest boundaries. Different bisexuals define bisexuality differently, and each person’s description is as correct as someone else’s.

However, not all sexual attractions to both genders can be fit into this term. The other labels (some of which are listed above) give more space and flexibility to people to define and express their sexual orientation.

Your sexual identity is your choice—and yours alone

For many, no other sexual identity could be truer than bisexual. If you feel attracted to both genders more or less equally and if the attraction to both genders is an integral part of your sense of who you are, perhaps only bisexual could do justice to your experience. Calling yourself bisexual could be a way to define yourself clearly—for yourself as well as others.

Everybody, however, does not feel the same way. A good percentage of people attracted to both men and women feel that the bisexual doesn’t define them aptly.

A review of several studies, done in 2013, revealed that about 23 percent women defined themselves as ‘mostly heterosexual’. The percentage of men who defined themselves as such was 9 percent.

Mostly heterosexual, or MH for short, are those people who experience same-sex attraction that is greater than what heterosexuals experience and less than what bisexuals experience. Mostly heterosexuals reported having experienced same-sex attractions, but for the major part these attractions were purely sexual, devoid of any romantic element. Mostly heterosexuals also confirmed that MH is not temporary, but rather an enduring orientation—just like bisexual.

The review also brought one important fact into limelight: many heterosexuals would prefer using an alternate sexual orientation. Mostly heterosexual is a term that is rarely, if ever, used in real life. MHs identify themselves as heterosexuals in real life. However, these people might be inclined to use descriptors like heteroflexible or bi-curious on online dating platforms.

It is also true that many MHs might also choose to identify themselves as bisexuals. After all, the bisexual description would not be incorrect for anyone who is attracted to both genders, even if he or she is attracted more to one gender than other.

What matters most is you should be comfortable?

Bisexual, bi-curious, heteroflexible, homoflexible, mostly homosexual, or mostly heterosexual at the end of the day are just descriptors of sexual orientation. All of them are flexible and fluid, and you should pick one which you think defines your sexual identity best.

Moreover, you are under no obligation to stick with one identity if you don’t want. Sexual identities are not absolute, neither are they prisons. What matters most is that you should be comfortable with the label. Which label you choose is secondary.

What am I is a question that every person, man or woman, who is attracted to both genders face. However, there are more than answers to this question. Contrary to what many think, “bisexual” does not fit every person attracted to both genders. Other terms also exist, and examples include bi-curious, homoflexible, heteroflexible, ‘mostly gay’, and ‘mostly gay’.

The term ‘bisexuality’ is not enough

Bisexuality is a fluid term. That is, it’s not fenced by strictest boundaries. Different bisexuals define bisexuality differently, and each person’s description is as correct as someone else’s.

However, not all sexual attractions to both genders can be fit into this term. The other labels (some of which are listed above) give more space and flexibility to people to define and express their sexual orientation.

Your sexual identity is your choice—and yours alone

For many, no other sexual identity could be truer than bisexual. If you feel attracted to both genders more or less equally and if the attraction to both genders is an integral part of your sense of who you are, perhaps only bisexual could do justice to your experience. Calling yourself bisexual could be a way to define yourself clearly—for yourself as well as others.

Everybody, however, does not feel the same way. A good percentage of people attracted to both men and women feel that the bisexual doesn’t define them aptly.

A review of several studies, done in 2013, revealed that about 23 percent women defined themselves as ‘mostly heterosexual’. The percentage of men who defined themselves as such was 9 percent.

Mostly heterosexual, or MH for short, are those people who experience same-sex attraction that is greater than what heterosexuals experience and less than what bisexuals experience. Mostly heterosexuals reported having experienced same-sex attractions, but for the major part these attractions were purely sexual, devoid of any romantic element. Mostly heterosexuals also confirmed that MH is not temporary, but rather an enduring orientation—just like bisexual.

The review also brought one important fact into limelight: many heterosexuals would prefer using an alternate sexual orientation. Mostly heterosexual is a term that is rarely, if ever, used in real life. MHs identify themselves as heterosexuals in real life. However, these people might be inclined to use descriptors like heteroflexible or bi-curious on online dating platforms.

It is also true that many MHs might also choose to identify themselves as bisexuals. After all, the bisexual description would not be incorrect for anyone who is attracted to both genders, even if he or she is attracted more to one gender than other.

What matters most is you should be comfortable?

Bisexual, bi-curious, heteroflexible, homoflexible, mostly homosexual, or mostly heterosexual at the end of the day are just descriptors of sexual orientation. All of them are flexible and fluid, and you should pick one which you think defines your sexual identity best.

Moreover, you are under no obligation to stick with one identity if you don’t want. Sexual identities are not absolute, neither are they prisons. What matters most is that you should be comfortable with the label. Which label you choose is secondary.

What am I is a question that every person, man or woman, who is attracted to both genders face. However, there are more than answers to this question. Contrary to what many think, “bisexual” does not fit every person attracted to both genders. Other terms also exist, and examples include bi-curious, homoflexible, heteroflexible, ‘mostly gay’, and ‘mostly gay’.

The term ‘bisexuality’ is not enough

Bisexuality is a fluid term. That is, it’s not fenced by strictest boundaries. Different bisexuals define bisexuality differently, and each person’s description is as correct as someone else’s.

However, not all sexual attractions to both genders can be fit into this term. The other labels (some of which are listed above) give more space and flexibility to people to define and express their sexual orientation.

Your sexual identity is your choice—and yours alone

For many, no other sexual identity could be truer than bisexual. If you feel attracted to both genders more or less equally and if the attraction to both genders is an integral part of your sense of who you are, perhaps only bisexual could do justice to your experience. Calling yourself bisexual could be a way to define yourself clearly—for yourself as well as others.

Everybody, however, does not feel the same way. A good percentage of people attracted to both men and women feel that the bisexual doesn’t define them aptly.

A review of several studies, done in 2013, revealed that about 23 percent women defined themselves as ‘mostly heterosexual’. The percentage of men who defined themselves as such was 9 percent.

Mostly heterosexual, or MH for short, are those people who experience same-sex attraction that is greater than what heterosexuals experience and less than what bisexuals experience. Mostly heterosexuals reported having experienced same-sex attractions, but for the major part these attractions were purely sexual, devoid of any romantic element. Mostly heterosexuals also confirmed that MH is not temporary, but rather an enduring orientation—just like bisexual.

The review also brought one important fact into limelight: many heterosexuals would prefer using an alternate sexual orientation. Mostly heterosexual is a term that is rarely, if ever, used in real life. MHs identify themselves as heterosexuals in real life. However, these people might be inclined to use descriptors like heteroflexible or bi-curious on online dating platforms.

It is also true that many MHs might also choose to identify themselves as bisexuals. After all, the bisexual description would not be incorrect for anyone who is attracted to both genders, even if he or she is attracted more to one gender than other.

What matters most is you should be comfortable?

Bisexual, bi-curious, heteroflexible, homoflexible, mostly homosexual, or mostly heterosexual at the end of the day are just descriptors of sexual orientation. All of them are flexible and fluid, and you should pick one which you think defines your sexual identity best.

Moreover, you are under no obligation to stick with one identity if you don’t want. Sexual identities are not absolute, neither are they prisons. What matters most is that you should be comfortable with the label on bisexual dating site. Which label you choose is secondary.

This was posted in Bdaily's Members' News section by kathe lee .

Our Partners

Top Ten Most Read